Know the serious injuries people can suffer in a slip-and-fall accident

Far from being a sight gag or a punchline, a slip-and-fall incident can be a debilitating and injurious experience. It is possible for people to suffer serious injuries when they slip and lose their balance, resulting in a fall.

Factors such as age and health can influence how serious a fall is. Once you understand the serious kinds of injuries that people can suffer, you will likely no longer consider such experiences humorous.

Broken bones are a common risk in a slip-and-fall accident

Broken bones, also known as fractures, are relatively common injuries that can occur in a broad range of traumatic incidents. Fall, including slip-and-fall accidents, can easily result in broken bones. In many cases, fractures of the arms, hands or fingers may be more common because of people attempting to brace or catch themselves as they fall. People can also break leg bones, ribs or even their hips.

Certain people are at higher risk for significant injuries related to a slip-and-fall accident. For example, adults over the age of 65 are potentially at greater risk of a broken bone and the complications that can result from it.

In some cases, people can suffer brain injuries

When someone can’t stop or slow a fall, they increase their risk of hitting their head and potentially suffering a brain injury. People who strike their heads on the floor, on their shopping cart or on nearby furniture or fixtures could easily wind up with a concussion or a traumatic brain injury.

These conditions often don’t show symptoms immediately. This is why anyone who hits their head or loses consciousness when they slip and fall would likely benefit from a medical evaluation afterward. Getting adequate care after a slip-and-fall may require making a premises liability claim against the owner or manager of the facility where you got hurt, especially if negligent maintenance played a role in the incident.

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